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APRIL 2001

MONTHLY    *    Vol 15-04 No:172    *   APRIL 2001 / MUHARRAM 1422H
  email: editor@islamicvoice.com

CHILDREN'S CORNER


The Dumb Witness
The Wise Qazi
The Two Saviours
Significance of Wordings of Salat
Kaabah
Love of Books
Arab Proverbs
Words from the Quran
April 2001 Contest

The Dumb Witness

Masood Faraz, Bangalore.

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ONCE there lived a farmer known as Rahmat. Hardworking as he was, he had bought a number of farms where he grew pumpkins and had gathered for himself a small fortune.

As it happened, he had to go to a nearby city in connection with a court case. It would take him about a month. So he engaged a watchman to take care of his farm. Another farmer, Nawab Jan, living closeby, had become jealous of Rahmat’s prosperity and could not see Rahmat a happy man at all.

So when Rahmat went to the city, Nawab bribed the watchman and began plucking Rahmat’s pumpkins. The watchman would load them onto Nawab’s bullock cart and later the pumpkins were sold in the market. The Watchman would get his share in the money so earned.

This continued till Rahmat returned to his village. Nawab had made quite a lot of money. Rahmat was upset to see a wide patch of farm without pumpkins. When Rahmat asked his watchman he acted as if he was innocent and did not know anything. Rahmat was a worried man now. He approached the Sarpanch (village headman) of the panchayat, Sohan Lal. He told him that he suspected Nawab for the theft but had no proof. Nawab was called to the Chaupal (village square) and asked if he had a hand in the pilferage of pumpkins from Rahmat’s farm. Nawab protested and the Sohan Lal was left with no choice but to let him go.

The wise headman thought and came up with a scheme. He walked up to the Nawab’s barn, sat on the cart, yoked the bullock and let the bullock free to pull the cart as it wished. As was its wont, the bullock reached Rahmat’s farm. The headman plucked a few pumpkins and ordered them to be loaded onto the cart. As a routine the bullock again took the cart to the vegetable market on the beaten path. Although Nawab did not tell the truth the dumb bullock solved the mystery.

The witness was enough to prove Nawab’s guilt. As a punishment, the headman asked Nawab and the watchman to return the money earned through sale of stolen pumpkins and also slapped a heavy fine on the devious duo.

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The Wise Qazi

Shazia Andaleeb

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THIS story belongs to the time of the Caliphs and the Qazis. When disputes were settled in courts headed by Qazis who ruled fairly and justly using their experience and expertise in detecting the truth. When there were no lawyers to turn truth into lies and twist lies into truth.

There was once a wayside inn which consisted of a single long dormitory. One day there were five men who were sharing it. One of them happened to be a diamond merchant. The five men spent the night together and in the morning, when they were ready to go their separate ways, the diamond merchant discovered that his bag of diamonds was missing. He was immediately suspicious of the four persons he had shared the room with him and was convinced that one of them was a thief.

He approached the local Qazi with his plea. The Qazi summoned the four men and questioned them. No one admitted to having stolen the diamonds. Having reached this dead-end with those men, the Qazi gave them each a stick. The Qazi then said: “The sticks given to you are the same in length, whoever of you here is the thief, his stick will grow longer by two inches through the night” So tomorrow morning we shall know who the thief among you is”

After this, the four men were confined in different rooms for the night. The thief among them grew nervous. He was scared that the stick might actually grow and prove him guilty. During the course of the night, he struck upon the idea to shorten the stick by two inches so that it remains the same as before even if it grows. He was now confident that he will not be caught.

The next morning, when the Qazi’s court assembled, the four accused were brought in. Their sticks were taken back and measured. It was found that one of the sticks was two inches shorter than the rest. The Qazi knew who the thief was and ordered him to return the diamonds to their rightful owner. And he ordered him to be whipped 50 times as a punishment for his crime of theft.

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The Two Saviours

Churchill, the prime minister of England, was saved from certain death during his childhood. And Chruchill’s father funded schooling of his saviour’s son who became the inventor of Pencillin. Here lies an interesting story.

HIS name was Fleming, and he was a poor Scottish farmer. One day, while trying to make a living for his family, he heard a cry for help coming from a nearby bog. He dropped his tools and ran to the bog. There, mired to his waist in black muck, was a terrified boy, screaming and struggling to free himself. Farmer Fleming saved the lad from what could have been a slow and terrifying death.

The next day, a fancy carriage pulled up to the Scotsman’s sparse surroundings. An elegantly dressed nobleman stepped out and introduced himself as the father of the boy Fleming had saved. “I want to repay you,” said the nobleman. “You saved my son’s life.”

“No, I can’t accept payment for what I did,” the Scottish farmer replied, waving off the offer.

At that moment, the Fleming’s own son came to the door of the family hovel.

“Is that your son?” The nobleman asked.

“Yes,” the farmer replied proudly.

“I’ll make you a deal. Let me provide him with the level of education my son will enjoy. If the lad is anything like his father, he’ll no doubt grow to be a man we both will be proud of.”

And that he did. Farmer Fleming’s son attended the very best schools and in time, he graduated from St. Mary’s Hospital Medical School in London, and went on to become known throughout the world as the noted Sir Alexander Fleming, the discoverer of Penicillin. He was later awarded the Nobel Prize for medicine.

Years afterward, the same noble man’s son who was saved from the bog was stricken with pneumonia. What saved his life this time? Penicillin. The name of the nobleman? Lord Randolph Churchill. His son’s name? Sir Winston Churchill.

Someone once said: What goes around comes around.... How true.

And just a final little reminder... Work like you don’t need the money. Love like you’ve never been hurt. Sing like nobody’s listening.

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Significance of Wordings of Salat

Shafia Ahmed, Chennai

SALAT (Namaz) is really a very blessed and auspicious observance. Every word uttered in it is filled with Allah’s greatness and sanctity. Sanaa, the opening prayer of Salat contains an extremely devotional meaning viz:

Subhaanaka Allaahumma Wa bihamdika wa tabaarakasmuka wa ta aalaa jadduka wa laa ilaaha ghairak

O Allah! I praise thy Sanctity. Thou art free from all blemishes. Thou art above anything that is not the best. I praise Thy glory. All virtues and beauties are admittedly for Thee and befit Thee. Thy name is blessed and in fact so blessed that blesses everything over which it is mentioned. Thy eminence is most exalted. Thy magnificence is most sublime. There is no God save Thee. None has ever been and none shall ever be fit to be worshipped save Thee.

Similarly in ruku we recite Subhaana rabbiyal azeem. Which means “My maginificent and Almighty Allah is free from all blemishes. I express my humbleness and weakness before his greatness by bowing my head before Him (for the bowing of head is the symbol of humbleness, just as a stiff neck is the sign of arrogance).

Similarly in Sajdah we express our submission before Allah and declare Him above all defects. Our head which is considered as the most superb part of our body along with our eyes, ears, nose and tongue is placed on ground before Him in the hope that He would show mercy and bestow His blessings on us.

Standing with our hands folded was the first expression of our submission. This was further augmented by the bending of our head in ruku and it reached its climax when we place our head on the ground before Him. In fact the whole Salaat is an indication of submission and therefore a means of success in this world and in the hereafter. May Allah through His kindness arouse all the Muslims to offer such a salaat.

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Kaabah

History and Importance

Md. Suhail Akbari

The Holy Kaabah

THE Kaabah is a small building which is cubic in shape. Muslims face towards it five times a day while performing their namaz since the time of the Prophet (Pbuh). People go around it during Haj and Umrah. This is called Tawaaf.

Kaabah is 12 meters high and its total size is 60 square meters. The inside of the Kaaba is 13 by 9 metres. The walls are one metre thick, the floor inside is 2.2 metres higher than the floor outside. Its ceiling and roof are made of teakwood, which is topped with stainless steel. The stones inside are unpolished while outside ones are polished.

This holy building was first constructed by the first man and Prophet Hazrat Adam, peace be upon him, and later on reconstructed by Hazrat Ibrahim, Ismail and Prophet Muhammad (Pbuh). No other building has had this honour. It has been reconstructed up to 12 times. The Most recent construction took place only four years ago. It has faced floods as well as human attacks in the past.

The Name Kaabah in Arabic means a high place with respect and prestige. The word Kaabah may also be a derivative of a word meaning a cube. It is also called Bait-ul-Ateeq meaning the earliest and ancient. It is also known as Bait-ul-Haram meaning the honourable house.

This small holy building has a great impact on man and history and is a unique one.

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Love of Books

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BOOKS are man’s best friends. They treasure knowl-edge. During the peak of the Islamic era, Muslims respected knowledge and spread it by writing new books. Here are a few scholars who are known for their love of books and contributions to knowledge through writing books

Mujaddudin Ferozabadi : (Died in 817 AH) He used to travel with a lot of books and kept reading them wherever his caravan set up camps. Once he purchased books worth 50,000 misqal worth of gold. He wrote a large number of books but his most widely known books is Qamoos (Arabic dictionary) which is in print even today.

Mufti Nooruddin Samhoudi : (Died 911 A.H.) He was born in Samhoud in Egypt. Everyone in Madinah was taught by him. He wrote three histories of Madinah. The first one got burnt. Second is titled Al-Wafa while the third one is Khulasatul Wafa and were published.

Sheikh Ali Muttaqi : (Died 975 AH). His native place was Jaunpur in India. Once he was travelling to Makkah, the boat was badly damaged and he could salvage all his books with great difficulty. He buried his books near the shore under the sand and set up a mark. It so happened that a Bedouin found them, carried them to Makkah and began to sell among the Hajj pilgrims. He found that the books belonged to none but himself. He quietly purchased the book. Kanzul Ammal written by Syuti was compiled and edited by Muttaqi. But for his effort, Kanzul Ammal would have remained wrapped under obscurity.

Hafiz Shamsuddin Sakhawi : (831-975 A.H.). He read countless numbers of books and taught at least 400 disciples. He was an authority in Hadith, Fiqh, History and Qirat. His books were full of wisdom and knowledge.

Hafiz Ibne Hajr Asqalani : (772-852 A.H.). He authored nearly 150 books. Of these the tafseer of Bukhari titled Sharah Fathul Bari is his magnum opus. He used to deliver discourses on Tafseer, Hadith and Fiqh. He held at least 1,000 sessions on Grammar. Leading scholars used to attend his lectures.

Imam Badruddin Maini : (762-855 A.H.) He was a tireless reader of books and was an equally rapid writer. He wrote Qaduri and Hawi in one night’s time. He had memorized books on history and lexicography. He wrote several books among which Umdatul Qari Sharahul Bukhari are very famous.

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Arab Proverbs

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Silah al mar'a dumu'aha

The weapon of a Woman is her Tears
Trust not a woman when she weeps

Courtesy : Primrose Arnander & Ashkhain Skipwith, Stacey International, London.


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Words from the Quran

Dr. Hasanuddin Ahmed



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April 2001 Contest

ISLAMIC VOICE

Crossword Puzzle

Please fill up the answers in this crossword with the help of the clues provided below. Cut the same and send us together with the coupon appearing below by May 10, 2001. Three prizes worth Rs. 300, Rs. 200 and Rs. 100 will be given for all-correct entries. The winners will be chosen by drawing of the lots.

Kindly provide your name, full address, age, school and class on the margins of the paper you will be using for pasting the filled-up crossword

Clues
Across
1.    First person to accept Islam (7)
3.    The Prophet’s (Pbuh) son-in-law (3)
6.    The first Khalifa (RA) (8)
7.    Lingua-franca of the Arabic world (6)
8.    Total (3)
9.    “Noor” in English (5)
11.   Ask Allah (4)
12.   Taxi (3)
14.   Verse of the Quran (4)
16.   The tomb of Mumtaz Mahal is in ________ (4)
17.   The script used by blind people (7)
18.   Difficult (6)

Down
1.    Baithullah (5)
2.    The uncle who looked after the Prophet (Pbuh) (8)
3.    “Al-Naml” in English (3)
4.    Haj Pilgrim’s attire (5)
5.    30th chapter of the Quran (5)
8.    Damascus is the capital of _________ (5)
9.    Bigger (6)
10.   Chop (3)
13.   Red as a _______ (4)
14.   First Prophet of Allah (4)
15.   _______ and hearty (4)

Results

February 2001 Contest

Following were adjudged the winners of the prizes for the Islamic Voice February 2001 Contest.
First Prize: Rs. 300, Sumaiya Tazeen, Mysore
Second Prize, Rs. 200, Iqbal Ahmed Farooqui, Hazaribagh, Jharkhand
Third Prize, Rs. 100, Asad Ahmed Siddiqui, Hyderabad

Two other all-correct entries were received from:
Mohammad Waqas Musba, Bhatkal, Karnataka.
Mohammad Mazharul Haque, Bangalore.

Correct Answers:

1. Prophet Mohammed (Pbuh) 2. Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi 3. Hazrat Abubaker Siddique (R.A) 4. Hazrat Usman Ghani (R.A) 5. Hazrath Ali (R.A) 6. Khalid-bin-Waleed 7. Gregor Mendel 8. Florence Nightingale 9. Tipu Sultan 10. Rani Lakshmi Bai
A.  Millennium Dome-London, England
B.  Petronas Tower-Kula Lumpur, Malaysia
C.  Eiffel Tower-Paris, France
D.  Gol Gumbaz-Bijapur, India
E.  Leaning Tower-Pisa,Italy

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