Islamic Voice A Monthly English Magazine

SAFAR
- RABI-UL-AWWAL 
1425 H
APRIL
2004
Volume 17-0
4 No : 208
Camps/Workshops

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Community Development


The Faizabad Literacy Project
A Moving Bridge

The Faizabad Literacy Project

The Literacy Project initiated by the Faizabad Societies serves as an excellent example of how Muslims can work wonders, through support from the community.

By Irfanullah Siddique

Faizabad and Ayodhya, situated on the bank of the river Ghaghra, are educationally backward districts of Uttar Pradesh. Large number of children do not go to schools here. They work on petty jobs engaged by their parents. Encountering misery at large scale in these areas, three educational societies of Faizabad, working in cohesion, conducted an educational and economic survey of Muslims in the urban and rural areas of Faizabad, in 1998. The survey revealed that illiteracy and poverty were dominating the community completely. At almost the same time, 'American Federation of Muslims of Indian Origin' (AFMI), declared their intention in its Annual Award Function at Aligarh, to help Indian Muslims achieve a goal of 100 per cent literacy within a span of 10 years. Encouraged by the resolve, the Faizabad Societies sent their survey reports to them. With these reports, a suggestion was also forwarded for establishing a network of ground level basic schools in Muslim dominated rural areas. The idea was to form a backbone of the movement for eradication of illiteracy. The proposal suggested that people of the area would be asked to provide space for these schools. Salaries and remaining expenses of the school would be met through the fees realised from students, and educational expenses of the poor would be realised through a Sponsorship Scheme that already existed at one of the society, Darsgah-e-Islami. The suggestion also proposed simultaneous development of the three main centers of educational activities i.e. Darsgah-e-Islami, Faiz-e-Aam Muslim School and AIFSO Junior High School, and adoption of common syllabus by them.

AFMI agreed to the proposal with a condition. It promised to provide the salary for two teachers per school, for two initial years only. After this period, the schools were expected to become self-sustaining. The societies accepted the challenge, and Faizabad Literacy Project was launched quietly, without much fanfare, with the establishment of three primary schools in 1999.

Now, within a span of five years, 20 schools have been established, providing qualitative religious and modern education to more than 2200 students in this region. These schools do not discriminate between religious groups and large number of non-Muslim students and teachers are part of these schools. The plan now is to expand this network of schools affiliated with the three centres.

Proper construction of the building of Faiz-e-Aam has not yet been taken up due to financial constraints. Classes are being held in temporary classrooms in tin sheds. A three-storey mosque in the school campus for boys and girls both is being constructed with the support of AFMI and others.

The two people who are mainly responsible for translation of this Project into a literacy movement are Irfanullah Siddiqui, and Mohammad Akhtar Siddiqui, patron and manager-cum-secretary respectively, of Faiz-e-Aam Society and affiliated AFMI Schools. They can be contacted at faizeducation@rediffmail.com; afmischools@rediffmail.com; faizeducation@yahoo.co.in. Check out the website of Darsgah Islami at 'http://www.geocities.com/darsgahfzd

Faiz-e-AamMuslimSchool,
322. College Road,
Faizabad -224001

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A Moving Bridge

Muslim immigrants in America, the Gulf or even Australia are finding their land of Dreams turning into a nightmare.

By E. Salahudheen

Trichur: A native of Trichur has come up with a plan for a "moving bridge" to help in avoiding the problems resulting from the rush during the stoning the Jamrah at Mina during Hajj. It is hoped that building a moving bridge on top of the existing bridge would clear the rush during the stoning at the Jamrah. The idea is proposed by Abdul Salam , son of Abdul Kader from Chavakkad. The moving bridge is to be located above the existing bridge at the stoning area at the Jamrah. It is designed to be moving to either side. The rush occurs mostly while the pilgrims moves in the opposite direction after stoning. But it is hoped that such rush can be avoided by the bridge that moves in both directions. The design also comprises of conveyer belts on both sides of the moving bridge. People needing to go to the opposite sides after stoning at Jamrah can use these belts to move in the opposite direction. There are also facilities for people to move out of the bridge using special ramps. Since the bridge moves very slowly in the first stage, it is possible for even old people to get on the bridge without difficulty. Walking can be avoided once the speed is faster. Large plates on the top of the bridge are planned to ensure that the pilgrims can throw stones without difficulty. Abdul Salam mentioned that the International airports at Netherlands and Dubai have such facilities. He also said that he would give details about this plan if the officials in charge of the Ministry of Hajj indicate an interest in this.

(Courtesy: Mathrubhumi)

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News Community Roundup Editorial Letters to the Editor Exclusive Making Difference Open House Trends Debate People Track Community Development Men, Missions and Machines Children's Corner Just for the Young Muslim Perspectives Quran Speaks to You Hadith Reflections Question Hour - Dr. Zakir Naik Religion Quran and Science Guidelines Women in Islam Muslims and Cyberspace Back to the Past Harmony Journey to Islam Job Hunt Matrimonial
Jobs Archives Feedback Subscription Links Calendar Contact Us

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