Islamic Voice A Monthly English Magazine

Jamadi Thani / Rajab 1425 H July 2004
Volume 17-07 No : 211
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Editorial


A Threshold Test

A Threshold Test

In Page 12 and 13 of this issue of Islamic Voice, we have published the SSLC (10th standard) results of Muslim managed high schools of Karnataka in an effort to analyse the performance of Muslim students at the first Board examinations students face in the career.

SSLC constitutes a threshold in the educational system in more ways than one. It provides the uniform opportunity for a variety of people running schools with variegated objectives to test the mettle of their products. Second, it opens the vistas for higher and professional education. Third, progress upwards solely depends on the educational foundation laid prior to the Board examination.

Seen in this context, the performance of Muslims schools in Karnataka does not inspire hope, though, it cannot be taken as any standard test to gauge the performance of the Muslim community as more Muslim students, as we observe, study in non-Muslim and non-Urdu medium schools in the State. But in some ways, it does cause anguish, because it reflects on the community’s ability to run educational institutions. It also causes concern, because a community that cannot run good schools, loses the better students to institutions run by other communities.

Some broad conclusions drawn from this exercise need to be commented upon. 1-Most Urdu medium schools are doing miserably and seem to be producing matriculates, who in all likelihood will either not proceed further in education or drop out of colleges very soon. 2- Privately managed but Government-aided Urdu medium schools in districts like Bidar and Gulbarga show promise and could be a model for future development. 3- The best of results are produced by privately managed English medium schools all through the State, more so in South Karnataka districts. 4-The results of Muslim students in schools managed by other communities are better than the one in the schools run by the Muslims themselves. Possibly, a survey of performance of Muslims students studying in Christian minority institutions (as well as in other community schools) in cities such as Bangalore, Mysore, Mangalore, Hassan, Kolar, Shimoga and Chikmagalur etc would throw up a more hopeful picture. Translated in simple terms, this would mean that academically better off Muslim students are not the products of Muslims schools. 5- Results from schools being run by old institutions of Karnataka (which are also receiving full grant-in-aid, such as Anjuman Islam in Hubli, Central Muslim Association in Bangalore, Anjuman Hami-e-Muslimeen in Bhatkal or Al-Mahmood in Shimoga etc cause dismay. But their misfortune is not of their own making. Education being free, they admit all and have little control over results, despite doing their best to sharpen the boys and girls from low economic strata of the society. A general complaint aired by the heads of the institutions is that the feeder institutions (state-run higher primary schools) provide sub-standard stuff which cannot be improved beyond a certain limit.

It will be pertinent to point out that Muslims in Karnataka need to look seriously at the secondary education in the state. Attention must be paid to state-run Urdu medium Higher Primary Schools (HPS) which generally send almost illiterates to the high schools due to laxity of standards. The Muslim NGOs should opt for adoption of HPSs in order to improve their functioning which involves signing of MoU with Department of Public Instruction for the sake of monitoring. Though difficult to admit, let it be said that in the atmosphere of liberalisation, poor economy also translates into poor education. These schools catering to poor sections of the community, suffer from poverty of vision. Only an alert, conscious and forward looking community can turn them around in times such as today’s, when resources are scarce and whatever is on offer from official quarters must be availed of in order to convert it into an asset.

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News Community Roundup Editorial Readers Comments Men, Missions and Machines Community Initiative Discover Yourself Trends Jeddah Diary Special Report Opinion Children's Corner Miscellany Back Fire Our Dialogue Facts on Faith Religion Hadith Quran and Science Journey to Islam Women in Islam Guide Lines Issues Sould Talk Ads & Ideas Matrimonial Jobs Archives Feedback Subscription Links Calendar Contact Us

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