Islamic Voice A Monthly English Magazine
Rabi-Ul-Awwal \ Rabi-Ul-Akhir 1424 H
June 2003
Volume 16-06 No : 198
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The Other View


Both India and Pakistan have failed to solve basic problems

Both India and Pakistan have failed
to solve basic problems

Saleem Jan Mazari, the leader of the four member Pakistani delegation on their recent visit to Mumbai mooted the idea of joint patrols at the Indo-Pak border to tackle infiltration and suggested setting on lines of EU, a union between India, Pakistan and Bangladesh to develop trade. Mazari described the MPs' visit as a private trip devoted entirely to promoting peace and friendship between the people of the two countries. Mazari, member of the National Assembly and former minister for Sindh, exuded the warmth and passion of a Sindhi while speaking to Islamic Voice. Here is the excerpt of the interview.


What do you think of India and Mumbai in particular?
In one word, itís great. Bombay is just like our Karachi.

What do you have to say about Pakistanís support for cross-border terrorism?
Time has come to address the issue of terrorism face to face. Our point is there is no such thing, but India says there is. So both countries could solve terrorism through joint patrolling or agreeing to the appointment of a neutral body to monitor the situation.

How do you compare the political scenario both in your country and India?
India is a great democracy. Unfortunately, Pakistan is not a democracy in the fullest sense. We have had elections last October and technically a democratic process was completed, but we have a controlled democracy. I have been an MP since 1985, but have never completed a term in Parliament, as there was intervention either by the military or a civilian government.

How can both the countries solve their problem?
The two countries cannot solve their problems through war or by refusing to address their differences. Both India and Pakistan have failed to solve basic problems like the lack of access to drinking water, health and education. Sustained dialogue and economic forums will solve lot of issues. Pakistan, India and Bangladesh should form a trade bloc in order to transform the sub-continent's economy into the fastest-growing in the world.

Why dialogues, though always start in the right earnest are derailed time and again?
There are certain people across the border and over here whose benefit lies in both countries not coming together and we have to be aware of them. The people should come together and encourage both the governments to go along with the mood of the masses.

Your comment on SAARC.
If the relations between India and Pakistan improve, then even this alliance could become more effective.

What about issues on which both sides are not willing to concede to the other? Issues, which cannot be solved overnight, should be kept in abeyance. What message are you taking back home?
The delegation would convey the feelings of the Indian people to the government back home and in future delegations on education, medical or technology, facilities could also be exchanged.

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News Community Roundup Editorial Readers Comments Men, Mission and Machines Insights Community Series People Investigation Islam & Economy Muslim Perspective Book review The Other View Children's Corner Quran Speaks to You Hadith Our Dialogue Reflection Religion Guide Lines Islamic History Living Islam Islam and Astronomy Archives-Talks Journey To Islam Miscellany Matrimonial Jobs Archives Feedback Subscription Links Calendar Contact Us

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