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Islamic Voice Logo
MONTHLY    *    Vol 11-05 No:124     *   May 1997/ MUHARRAM 1419H

email: editor@islamicvoice.com

EDITORIAL


The Unpredictable 'Gaddi'


The Unpredictable 'Gaddi'

‘I wouldn’t be the next Prime Minister of the Country if they came and begged me on their bended knees,’ was the comment from one supposed aspirant for the gaddi, ‘for the job, as everyone has realised by now, is fraught with innumerable imponderables.’ How true! If somebody doesn’t pump you full of holes with a gun or blow you to kingdom come with bombs or a few sticks of dynamite there is sure to be some godman or some assistant godmen coming along with crores of hawala-tainted rupees to tempt you into giving contracts of those out of whom he has made crores. It doesn’t pay to fall foul of godmen in this god-damned political ‘shatranj’ for some of them are adepts at the art of king-making, or king-breaking. Any Prime Minister who owes a lot to a few chosen party men, for any one of them is capable of dumping him in the dust-bin of history in the twinkling of an eye.

And woe betide you if you have formed a ministry with outside support from any party, for you can bet your bottom dollar that the leader of this outside-support party will find, as time passes and your popularity is on the rise, that now would be the time to pull the rug from under your feet and make you fall down in a heap, which is what happened to poor Deva Gowda recently. If you are one of a crowd forming a government you have to exercise the greatest care not to tread on any toes, lest the owner of the toes try to avenge himself by bringing you down from your ‘gaddi’ like a sack of coals/ And when that happens you are faced with two alternatives, viz; step down gracefully like Mr.. Deva Gowda did, or stick to your wobbling ‘gaddi’, but you know, MPs cost the earth these days, and who knows but that these self-same MPs or at least some of them might not blow the gaff when it suits them and make you name mud?

And if you are one of those Prime Ministers who are never happier than when surrounded by scams and hawalas and forgery cases like flies round a jar of honey the fall is all the more galling for all those files are bound to put paid to your future career as a politician. You might try to stage a come-back in the next elections to Parliament, and you find that the nation has washed its hands of you and you party, and all your erstwhile cronies drift away from you like rats leaving a sinking ship and are too busy, anyway, in horse-trading to worry about you. So the rat race starts all over again. Concessions, compromises, promises all come into play. A new Prime Minister is foisted on the nation, leaving behind a host of disgruntled elements which had lost out on the bid for the coveted chair. By and by they begin to make their presence felt, and comes a time when they throw off the mast of camaraderie and bare their teeth. And the new Prime Minister then bites the dust. It is a vicious circle.

As everyone in any new combination is only interested in making hay while the sun shines the interest of the common man always takes a back seat. But as few in the fray realised the common man has a nasty habit of coming back into his own when election time comes round again. If only this lesson is taken to heart by those in the fray we might yet have a government with some sort of stability.
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