Islamic Voice A Monthly English Magazine
Safar\Rabi-Ul-Awwal 1424 H
May 2003
Volume 16-05 No : 197
Camps \ Workshops

News Community Roundup Editorial Readers Comments Men, Mission and Machines War & Peace Community Series Profile Investigation Event Diary Muslim Perspective Commentary Children's Corner Narrative Quran Speaks to You Hadith Our Dialogue Reflection Religion The Month Of Rabi-Ul-Awwal Islamic History Women in Islam Islam and Astronomy Living Islam Miscellany Journey To Islam Matrimonial Jobs Archives Feedback Subscription Links Calendar Contact Us

Now you can pay for subscriptions online

Men Mission and Machines


Farmers Friend
Homes Sweet Homes!


A Farmers Friend

As Chairman of the Farmers Development Agency,
Liaqath has initiated a host of programmes for the rural folk.

Mr Liaqath, Chairman  of Farmer's Development Agency Who cares for farmers these days? Do we ever give a thought to their welfare? D.M. Liaqath could have easily got into a high-tech multi-national company and spent his life in air-conditioned cabins, but it was his concern for the farmers that brought him into working for their upliftment. The Farmers Development Agency (FDA) gained prominence and importance because of his efforts.

Liaqath, 53, was born and brought up in Chickballapur and settled there. He has done his Diploma in Rural Development Management at the prestigious National Institute of Rural Development. He initiated and conducted many training camps, seminars and conferences for the rural people on economic development, education and entrepreneurship for rural women, on drinking water, besides conducting programmes on employment generation, housing and technology transfer.

Liaqath built a very good network with international agencies like CEBEMO of Netherlands, UNESCO, and SIDA with a view to promote voluntarism and provide a common platform. He was the founder Chairman of Federation of District Voluntary organization (FEDVORK) in 1990 in Kolar. Nearly 26 organisations working in the district of Kolar are members of this federation. Liaqath worked with the Government of India as

principle Investigator, DST project and coordinated a project on Water, Health and Sanitation and Universalisation on Elementary Education in Bangalore rural district.

He is also a life member of the Indian Institute of Public Administration, Indian Society for Training and Development and the Society for Promotion of Wasteland Development.

The Government of Karnataka nominated Liaqath as a member of the District Wakf Committee, Kolar where he served for three years. He was instrumental in bringing out the Newsletter on Non-Formal Education as its editor for the benefit of 100 NFE centers. With strong support of his family, wife and three sons, Liaqath is presently working as Chairman at FDA and can be reached at


: 240, First Cross, Nagarathpet, Chickballapur-562101
Phone: 08156-73108, Fax: 08156-72486.

Top


Homes Sweet Homes!

It is imperative that Muslims think of housing on a community level and come out of towns and cities to set up new localities.

Muslims are facing acute housing shortage in towns and cities across the country. They live in shanties and slums, on the water-logged lands, railway sidings and in all other kinds of vulnerable areas. Since these are not planned, they lack basic facilities such as accessibility, roads, power and water connection, schools, post offices, bus stops, garbage cleaning and all other civic network, to meet the day to day needs of the community. Invariably, in every city, the proportion of Muslims living in slums is higher than their population percentage.

In the 70s, Maulana Ziauddin Bukhari took up housing as a mission and set up some colonies such as Millat Nagar, Wahdat Nagar and Rahmathnagar in the vicinity of Mumbai. Though it took a long time and lot of persuasion, these colonies brought some relief for Muslims who till then had not thought of housing on a community level.

Housing is key to civilisation. Even the holy Prophet (Pbuh) had directed his followers: If the population of Madinah exceeds certain limit, they should set up another city rather than allowing more people to settle in.

Poet Mohammad Iqbal had interpreted this hadith as: Increasing population of a city reduces its economic and cultural energy. Thus evil forces replace the cultural forces. There is a need to set up satellite towns around the cities that need expansion.

Muslims besides facing cultural insecurity and lack of civic amenities, also face the physical insecurity in mixed localities as was experienced during the 1992-93 riots in Mumbai. It is therefore imperative that they think of housing on a community level and come out of towns and cities to set up new localities on highways and major roads in order to ensure neat, healthy and environment-friendly living. Such localities should have gymnasium, school, masjid, gardens, parks and playground, graveyard, joggers track, shopping complex, post office, library, convention halls, reading rooms and madrassa. Here we present a financial estimate of an ideal housing locality. (The estimates may vary from city to city given the ruling costs of land, material and services.)

A lakh sq. metre of land may cost Rs. 50 lakh. This piece of land could be built up to construct a multi-storeyed housing space of 5 lakh sq. ft. The going cost of construction currently is Rs. 350 per sq. ft. Thus the construction cost would come up to Rs. 17.50 crore. Community facilities such as mosque, convention hall, school, playground, park, joggers track and others could be constructed or laid at a cost of Rs. 2 crore. Thus the total cost comes up to Rs. 25 crore. The entire housing space could thus be sold at a cost of Rs. 500 per sq. ft. and it would fetch a price of Rs. 25 crore thereby yielding a profit of Rs. 5 crore.

Some other possibilities could also be considered. If houses are built in three storeys (ground plus two floors), an open space of 8.33 lakh sq. ft is available for community facilities or for parks, gardens, roads and tracks. Some of the occupants can also opt for single floor row-houses or cottages. Some even can go for just the plots of land and can develop it as per their own needs, scheme and design. Several banks are now liberally extending loans for housing and cooperative societies. (This is the translation of an Urdu note circulated by M.I. Ansari, Bhiwandi. For more information contact : M.I. Ansari Phone: 02522-279303 / 278303 e-ansari.m.i@indiatimes.com)

Top



News Community Roundup Editorial Readers Comments Men, Mission and Machines War & Peace Community Series Profile Investigation Event Diary Muslim Perspective Commentary Children's Corner Narrative Quran Speaks to You Hadith Our Dialogue Reflection Religion The Month Of Rabi-Ul-Awwal Islamic History Women in Islam Islam and Astronomy Living Islam Miscellany Journey To Islam Matrimonial Jobs Archives Feedback Subscription Links Calendar Contact Us

Al-Nasr Exports