Why Do We Need Religious Beliefs?

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Why Do We Need Religious Beliefs?

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“Anas Ibn Malik (RA) narrated: A man said, ‘O Messenger of Allah, shall I trust in Allah with my camel tied, or shall I trust in Allah with it untied?’ The Messenger of Allah, peace and blessings be upon him, said, ‘Tie him and put your trust in Allah.’

According to researchers at Harvard Medical School at McLean Hospital, religious coping can significantly improve treatment outcomes for people receiving short-term treatment for mental illness; Published in the November 30 issue of Psychiatry Research, David H. Results of a study on rosemary. However, those who use positive religious coping strategies, such as prayer and accepting “God’s plan,” perform significantly better in short-term psychotherapy than those who do not.”

Religious upbringing in adulthood is associated with better health and well-being. Participating in spiritual practices in early adulthood, childhood, and adolescence may be a protective factor in health and well-being outcomes, according to a Harvard T.H. new study. Chan School of Public Health researchers found that people who attended weekly religious services or practiced daily prayer or meditation in their youth reported greater life satisfaction and positivity in their 20s—and beyondthan people who grew up with less regular spiritual practices. They were less likely to have depressive symptoms, smoke, use illicit drugs, or have sexually transmitted infections. These findings are important to our understanding of health and our understanding of parenting practices. Author Ying Chen, who recently completed her postdoctoral fellowship at the Harvard Chan School, said that “many children are raised religiously, and our study shows that this can strongly influence their health behaviors, mental health, overall happiness, and well-being. The study was published on September 13, published online in the American Journal of Epidemiology in 2018. Previous studies have linked religious involvement in adults to better health and well-being outcomes, including a lower risk of premature death.

Religious beliefs can lead to positive emotional benefits. Stanford anthropologist Tanya Luhrmann says it takes effort to create relationships with supernatural others that can lead to meaningful change. In a new book, Stanford anthropologist Tanya Luhrmann explores the intersection of religion and science, connecting deep religious beliefs with beneficial, scientifically proven practices like mindfulness and cognitive behavioral therapy. Anthropologist Tanya Luhrmann explores how religious practices and narratives can create profound, positive change for the people who engage with them.

Luhrmann argues that believers often must work hard to make supernatural beings real, and those who are able to do so experience helpful changes. “If they’re lucky, they’re able to attend to their thoughts differently, feel calmer and more loved,” she said. These positive outcomes reinforce religious practices, encouraging sustained commitment to ritual and observance.

Because most people make a clear distinction between real and unreal in their lives. For example, Luhrmann writes that most people, even those with deep faith, do not ask God to feed their dogs or write their journals and that religious traditions address this dichotomy. Referring to a famous Islamic hadith, Luhrmann wrote: “Anas Ibn Malik (RA) narrated: A man said, ‘O Messenger of Allah, shall I trust in Allah with my camel tied, or shall I trust in Allah with it untied?’ The Messenger of Allah, peace and blessings be upon him, said, ‘Tie him and put your trust in Allah.’

Research has repeatedly shown that people who believe feel better and healthier. One of the most interesting findings in social epidemiology, Luhrmann notes, is that religious involvement with God is good for your body’s immune function and reduces loneliness.

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